Research Group

Abdullahi Hussein Ali (PhD student, UW)

Abdullahi Hussein Ali (PhD student, UW)

I am interested in wildlife ecology and conservation of arid ecosystems, particularly in the Horn of Africa. I am currently PhD student at the University of Wyoming and an EDGE fellow through the Zoological Society of London. My dissertation focuses on habitat selection and demography of hirola in northeastern Kenya.

Adam Ford (PhD student, UBC)

Adam Ford (PhD student, UBC)

My research interests are focused on spatial ecology and animal movement using, wherever possible, mammals to answer my questions. These interests have manifested in two forms. First, my dissertation research addresses the effects of risk on the ecology of two species of Pecora, the ca.45kg gregarious impala and the ca. 5kg obligate monogamous Guenther’s dik-dik.

Ali Hassan (research technician, Mpala)

Ali Hassan (research technician, Mpala)

Ali has worked with our research group for over 10 years. He is the consummate natural historian, with encyclopedic knowledge of darned near every critter--flora and fauna--on the UHURU project. Ali is absolutely essential to keeping our projects in Laikipia running smoothly while we're across the pond.

Amos Kibara (research technician, Ijara)

Amos Kibara (research technician, Ijara)

For the past two years, Amos Muthee Kibara has worked as the lead technician for Ali's field work on hirola conservation in Ijara, Kenya. He joined our group from the Mount Kenya Conservancy where he helped manage a captive breeding program for highland bongos. We are glad Amos has sacrificed personal comfort to trade the balmy foothills of Mount Kenya for the blistering heat of Ijara for this work!
Anne Marie Hodge (PhD student, UW)

Anne Marie Hodge (PhD student, UW)

I graduated from Auburn University in 2009, and recently finished my Master's degree at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. Here, I studied niche partitioning mechanisms between sympatric carnivores in the eastern Andean foothills of Ecuador.

Brendan Oates (MSc Student, UW)

Brendan Oates (MSc Student, UW)

Wandering about downtown Cordoba, Argentina in 2007, I realized it had me: Nature Deficit Disorder. I needed to get out and into the mountains, into fresh air. I packed my backpack, locked my apartment, and headed to Patagonia for a few days. Here, it finally became obvious what career was calling me, and what I needed to do.

Brett Jesmer (PhD student, UW)

Brett Jesmer (PhD student, UW)

During my undergraduate work at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry and my post baccalaureate research at the University of California, Davis I developed a great breadth of research interests that span the broad ecological sub-disciplines of behavior, nutrition, and demography.

Caroline Ng’weno (PhD student, UW)

Caroline Ng’weno (PhD student, UW)

I was born and grew up in a small village in Keiyo District, Kenya, where I spent a lot of time tending livestock and fetching firewood in the bush. My interaction with nature and wild creatures during my childhood provided a source of wonder and inspiration toward the environment.

Christian Bopp (research technician, UW)

Christian Bopp (research technician, UW)

Christian Bopp (right) is working with Caroline on Ol Pejeta Conservancy to characterize the determinants of lion kill-sites. He is a senior undergraduate majoring in Zoology at UW. In this photo, Christian is simulating the role of a poacher (who typically wear oversized puffy blue coveralls), thereby enticing a special forces dog to gnaw on his arm.
Deborah Boro (MSc student, UNM)

Deborah Boro (MSc student, UNM)

Deborah is working with Seth Newsome and Jake to understand the causes and consequences of ecological generalism in small mammal communities. As you can see from her photo, Deborah relishes test tubes, beakers, pipettes, and fume hoods--you know, real science. We are lucky to have her on board!
Jake Goheen

Jake Goheen

I am a lucky fellow because I get paid to do what I love to do. I am an academic generalist and I try hard to be a conservation biologist, community ecologist, and mammalogist simultaneously. I am interested in both applied issues and basic questions in ecology. Through my research and that of our group, I try to understand how species interactions can inform wildlife conservation and management.

Simon Lima (research technician, Mpala)

Simon Lima (research technician, Mpala)

(pictured here after a trying stint in Tsavo National Park) has worked for us since 2004. He is a guru with GPS, ungulate captures, and radio-telemetry, and he can spot giraffes at over 500 km (pun intended, to be sure). And he's the proud father of two of the cutest kids in Laikipia.

Tobias Otieno (MSc student, Moi U)

Tobias Otieno (MSc student, Moi U)

I am working toward my MSc in Wildlife Management at Moi University in Kenya, coadvised by Jake Goheen and Mordecai Ogada of the Laikipia Wildlife Forum. I am collaborating closely with Adam Ford to understand how the perceived risk of predation affects diet selectivity of impala, a mixed-feeder abundant throughout Laikipia.